Rosary Academy’s Mock Trial Team

Rosary+Academy%27s+prestigious+Mock+Trial+Team+at+the+Santa+Ana+Courthouse.+Photo+by+Sylvia+Cazarez.+

Rosary Academy's prestigious Mock Trial Team at the Santa Ana Courthouse. Photo by Sylvia Cazarez.

Isabel Alderete, Staff Writer

Picture this: as you enter the court room and look to your left, you see the person being accused of murder. It is up to you to defend them, but it won’t be easy. Luckily, you have the rest of the Mock Trial Team at your side to help you along the way. If situations like these interest you, then Mock Trial is just the thing for you. But what exactly is mock trial? The Royal Reporter decided to find out by interviewing Rosary Academy’s Mock Trial Team Captains.

Marysol Cazarez in action during trial. Photo by Sylvia Cazarez.

Before interviewing the co-captains, the Royal Reporter decided to research mock trial at high schools in general. According to College Vine, “High school students act out a civil or criminal trial by arguing for either the prosecution or defense side against another team, which acts as the opposing side.” At the beginning of Mock Trial season, each team is given a case packet with many rules and specifications. Usually, team members assign different roles in the case to each other, including trial attorneys, witnesses, pre-trial attorneys, bailiffs, and one time-keeper. These students then work together to come up with a well-developed case.

Serena Park ’21 is one of the co-captains of the Mock Trial Team. She has been on mock trial for three years, and has loved every moment of it. In order to describe mock trial, Serena said, “Mock trial is an amazing program that prepares you for the law field and improves public speaking and analytical reasoning skills.” She told the Royal Reporter that each year, mock trial teams each receive the same case packet, which is based off a real case. To break it down, Serena told the Royal Reporter that the case packet has eight witness testimonies and the attorneys have to use those testimonies to formulate their case and defend it in actual court. Each school has the same case across the state.

Mock Trial posing for a photo before going into action at trial. Photo by Sylvia Cazarez.

Marysol Cazarez, the other co-captain, told the royal reporter that this year’s case is a murder trial where someone is accused of first degree murder. This year, Caroline Linton ’21 is playing the role of Bailey Matsumoto, who is being accused of murder, and it is up to Rosary’s defense and prosecution teams to either defend her or find her guilty. Mock trial competes in rounds against other schools. Each team is guaranteed the first four rounds, but after that, they can be eliminated, depending on their scores. At each trial, they wear professional attire, such as a business suit with blazers, pants, blouses, or skirts.

Mock Trial Team dressed in tasteful professional attire. Photo by Sylvia Cazarez.

Overall, Mock Trial is a very intense, yet rewarding experience at Rosary. The co-captains would like to encourage you to join Mock Trial for the next season. Their next trial is November 19th, so be sure to come out and support!